cis-JASMONE - CAS 488-10-8
Category:
Flavor & Fragrance
Product Name:
cis-JASMONE
Synonyms:
2-Cyclopenten-1-one, 3-methyl-2-(2Z)-2-pentenyl-, cis-JASMONE
CAS Number:
488-10-8
Molecular Weight:
164.25
Molecular Formula:
C11H16O
COA:
Inquire
MSDS:
Inquire
Olfactive Family:
Floral
FEMA:
3196
Odor description:
A very diffusive jasmine, celery seed note, with a hint of black tea.
Taste description:
Lactonic, pleasant fuzzy peach, apricot notes.
Chemical Structure
CAS 488-10-8 cis-JASMONE

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Reference Reading


1.Continuous exposure to the deterrents cis-jasmone and methyl jasmonate does not alter the behavioural responses of Frankliniella occidentalis.
Egger B1, Spangl B2, Koschier EH1. Entomol Exp Appl. 2016 Jan;158(1):78-86. Epub 2015 Dec 12.
Behavioural responses of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), a generalist, cell sap-feeding insect species with piercing-sucking mouthparts, after continuous exposure to two deterrent secondary plant compounds are investigated. We compared in choice assays on bean leaf discs, the settling, feeding, and oviposition preferences of F. occidentalis females that had no experience with the two fatty acid derivatives methyl jasmonate and cis-jasmone before testing (naïve thrips) vs. females that had been exposed to the deterrent compounds before testing (experienced thrips). The thrips were exposed to the deterrents at low or high concentrations for varied time periods and subsequently tested on bean leaf discs treated with the respective deterrent at either a low or a high concentration. Frankliniella occidentalis females avoided settling on the deterrent-treated bean leaf discs for an observation period of 6 h, independent of their previous experience.
2.Fractionation and identification of minor and aroma-active constituents in Kangra orthodox black tea.
Joshi R1, Gulati A2. Food Chem. 2015 Jan 15;167:290-8. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.06.112. Epub 2014 Jul 5.
The aroma constituents of Kangra orthodox black tea were isolated by simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE), supercritical fluid extraction and beverage method. The aroma-active compounds were identified using gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry. Geraniol, linalool, (Z/E)-linalool oxides, (E)-2-hexenal, phytol, β-ionone, hotrienol, methylpyrazine and methyl salicylate were major volatile constituents in all the extracts. Minor volatile compounds in all the extracts were 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, ethylpyrazine, 2-6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone, acetylfuran, hexanoic acid, dihydroactinidiolide and (E/Z)-2,6-nonadienal. The concentrated SDE extract was fractionated into acidic, basic, water-soluble and neutral fractions. The neutral fraction was further chromatographed on a packed silica gel column eluted with pentane and diethyl ether to separate minor compounds. The aroma-active compounds identified using gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry were 2-amylfuran, (E/Z)-2,6-nonadienal, 1-pentanol, epoxylinalool, (Z)-jasmone, 2-acetylpyrrole, farnesyl acetone, geranyl acetone, cadinol, cubenol and dihydroactinidiolide.
3.Characterisation of odorant compounds and their biochemical formation in green tea with a low temperature storage process.
Katsuno T1, Kasuga H, Kusano Y, Yaguchi Y, Tomomura M, Cui J, Yang Z, Baldermann S, Nakamura Y, Ohnishi T, Mase N, Watanabe N. Food Chem. 2014 Apr 1;148:388-95. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.10.069. Epub 2013 Oct 24.
We produced low temperature (15 °C) processed green tea (LTPGT) with higher aroma contents than normal green tea (Sencha). Normal temperature processed green tea (NTPGT), involved storing at 25 °C, and Sencha had no storing process. Sensory evaluation showed LTPGT had higher levels of floral and sweet odorants than NTPGT and Sencha. Aroma extract dilution analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry indicated LTPGT had 12 aroma compounds with high factor dilution values (FD). Amongst LTPGT's 12 compounds, indole, jasmine lactone, cis-jasmone, coumarin, and methyl epijasmonate contributed to floral, fruity and sweet characters. In particular, indole increased initially, peaking at 16 h, then gradually decreased. Feeding experiments suggested [(15)N]indole and [(15)N]oxygenated indoles (OX-indoles) were produced from [(15)N]anthranilic acid. We proposed the increase in indole was due to transformation of anthranilic acid during the 16 h storage and the subsequent decline in indole level was due to its conversion to OX-indoles.
4.Habituation in Frankliniella occidentalis to deterrent plant compounds and their blends.
Egger B1, Spangl B2, Koschier EH1. Entomol Exp Appl. 2014 Jun;151(3):231-238. Epub 2014 Apr 22.
Feeding and oviposition deterrence of three secondary plant compounds and their 1:1 blends to adult female Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and the potential for habituation of the thrips to the pure compounds and the 1:1 blends at various concentrations were investigated. In choice assays, we tested dose-dependent feeding and oviposition deterrence of the two fatty acid derivatives methyl jasmonate and cis-jasmone, the phenylpropanoid allylanisole, and their blends when directly applied to bean leaf discs. The concentration required to reduce the feeding damage by 50% relative to the control treatment (FDC50) was lowest for cis-jasmone and highest for allylanisole. The feeding deterrent effect of both jasmonates was increased when blended with allylanisole. Feeding deterrence and oviposition deterrence were strongly correlated. In no-choice assays conducted over four consecutive days, we discovered that dilutions at low concentrations (FDC15) applied to bean leaves resulted in habituation to the deterrents, whereas no habituation occurred at higher concentrations (FDC50).