1-OCTEN-3-YL ACETATE FCC - CAS 2442-10-6
Category:
Flavor & Fragrance
Product Name:
1-OCTEN-3-YL ACETATE FCC
Synonyms:
1-Octen-3-ol, acetate, 1-OCTEN-3-YL ACETATE FCC, Amyl Vinyl Carbinyl Acetate
CAS Number:
2442-10-6
Molecular Weight:
170.25
Molecular Formula:
C10H18O2
COA:
Inquire
MSDS:
Inquire
Olfactive Family:
Mint
FEMA:
3582
Odor description:
Lavender or lavandin odor with minty undertones.
Taste description:
Fresh pear, fruity character.
Chemical Structure
CAS 2442-10-6 1-OCTEN-3-YL ACETATE FCC

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Reference Reading


1.Arachidonic acid-dependent carbon-eight volatile synthesis from wounded liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha).
Kihara H1, Tanaka M2, Yamato KT3, Horibata A3, Yamada A3, Kita S3, Ishizaki K4, Kajikawa M5, Fukuzawa H5, Kohchi T5, Akakabe Y6, Matsui K7. Phytochemistry. 2014 Nov;107:42-9. doi: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.08.008. Epub 2014 Aug 28.
Eight-carbon (C8) volatiles, such as 1-octen-3-ol, octan-3-one, and octan-3-ol, are ubiquitously found among fungi and bryophytes. In this study, it was found that the thalli of the common liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, a model plant species, emitted high amounts of C8 volatiles mainly consisting of (R)-1-octen-3-ol and octan-3-one upon mechanical wounding. The induction of emission took place within 40min. In intact thalli, 1-octen-3-yl acetate was the predominant C8 volatile while tissue disruption resulted in conversion of the acetate to 1-octen-3-ol. This conversion was carried out by an esterase showing stereospecificity to (R)-1-octen-3-yl acetate. From the transgenic line of M. polymorpha (des6(KO)) lacking arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, formation of C8 volatiles was only minimally observed, which indicated that arachidonic and/or eicosapentaenoic acids were essential to form C8 volatiles in M. polymorpha. When des6(KO) thalli were exposed to the vapor of 1-octen-3-ol, they absorbed the alcohol and converted it into 1-octen-3-yl acetate and octan-3-one.
2.Acaricidal activities of the active component of Lycopus lucidus oil and its derivatives against house dust and stored food mites (Arachnida: Acari).
Yang JY1, Lee HS. Pest Manag Sci. 2012 Apr;68(4):564-72.
BACKGROUND: Recent studies have focused on materials derived from plant extracts as mite control products against house dust and stored food mites because repeated use of synthetic acaricides had led to resistance and unwanted activities on non-target organisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acaricidal activity of materials derived from Lycopus lucidus against Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus and Tyrophagus putrescentiae.